The joy of Windows-based development

My wife had a very neat idea lately. In order to make this blog less boring from a visual point of view, she proposed rotating regularly the photograph at the top (currently showing a view from one of our windows). The real kick, however, would have been having the CSS to dynamically adapt to the new photo, with titles, links, lines and everything else matching the image colours.

Seeing is believing, so she fired up Eclipse and started coding. Shortly she had a working version of a java application that, given a picture, is able to grab the main color used in the palette. From then on, having something to automatically spit out a CSS would have been a piece of cake.

The results were definitely impressive and promising. The color bar above the picture was dinamically generated from the initial output:

Nuancer output

Nuancer output

Nuancer output

Nuancer output

However, before starting to write the CSS part, I suggested some refactoring was in order. In particular, due to a typo, one of the class names was inconsistent with Java naming conventions since it started with smallcaps. I then suggested to use the Eclipse refactor menu and just rename the source file letting Eclipse do the rest.

Last famous words. My wife’s PC is running Windows, and even though we’re in 2005 now, still the Windows filesystem is case insensitive. What happens then when you rename “fooClass” to “FooClass” in Eclipse? You don’t want to know, and definitely you don’t want to try. The source file was blasted, deleted, nuked, vaporized and forgotten, with no way on earth to recover.

Bottom line: this blog will keep the current skin for a while (we’re busy with other stuff now), Windows sucks and Eclipse should know better and warn you before nuking your work because of an OS deficiency. But my wife rulez. :)

Comments

comments

6 thoughts on “The joy of Windows-based development”

  1. Extracting a CSS palette from a photo
    I’d forgotten to link to this but Ben Hyde reminded me today (by linking to it himself). I’m not sure how difficult this is, as it never occurred to me to try. Very Cool.

  2. Your wife does rule! That application would totally rock. If you ever recover it, and care to share it, please let us know. Right now I can’t envision a use, but I’m sure I could learn a lot from that code.

  3. Did you try right clicking on the src folder and selecting “restore from local history”? I had a similar situation a while back and this worked for me.

    Ross

  4. I’ve never had a problem like that with windows. I even just tried it – refactoring Maybe it’s Eclipse. I did have a problem like that happen once myself – but only after I tried to synchronize with CVS. Man, and even though we’re in 2005 now, still the CVS repository is case sensitive. . 😉

    I just tried it in Eclipse on Windows – my renaming of the class went ok. I even quite and restarted Eclipse. I second that guys suggestion that you look in Eclipse’s local history and try to recover it from there.

    Good luck.

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